M.C. Moran

Canadian Census Quirk: Married Women’s Maiden Names

A Scottish quirk?

For the most part, you are not going to find married women’s maiden names in the Canadian census returns (nor in the English or US census returns either, for that matter). Census enumerators were neither required nor expected to record married women’s maiden names; not surprisingly, most of them did not do so.

But occasionally (very occasionally indeed), you will find a census enumeration where the enumerator did record the maiden names of married women. A useful quirk, from the perspective of the genealogist, and a bit of a research bonus if you’re lucky enough to find such an emumeration.

From the 1861 enumeration of the Township of Algona in Renfrew County, here, for example, is the household of Cornelius Harrington, who is listed along with his wife Margaret Ryan (here spelled “Reyan”), his sister-in-law Johanna Ryan, and his children Michael and Bridget:

Cornelius Harrington household, 1861 census of Canada West (Ontario), Renfrew County, Algona, p. 1, lines 39-43.

Cornelius Harrington household, 1861 census of Canada West (Ontario), Renfrew County, Algona, p. 1, lines 39-43.

That “U C” — for the birthplace of Michael and Bridget Harrington — stands for Upper Canada. The “R C” of course stands for Roman Catholic.

My guess is that this census enumerator was Scottish (and I suppose I could look this up, but for now I’ll leave it as a guess). In Scotland, it was customary to call a married woman by her maiden name even after marriage. To be sure, most Scottish or Scottish-Canadian enumerators of the Canadian census followed the English practice (which was what they were instructed to do, after all) of listing married women by their husband’s surnames (which was a married woman’s legal surname, of course). But in the only other example I have seen of an enumerator of the Canadian census listing married women by maiden names, that enumerator was Scottish.

NEW feature: the Ottawa Valley Irish Discussion FORUM

This is a new and experimental feature, which I am going to try out for at least a few months:

the Ottawa Valley Irish Discussion Forum

This is a forum where readers can post and reply to queries about surnames, families, localities, records, and so on. I am hoping it might serve as an alternative to my currently haphazard “system” (it is not a system!) of email queries.

In order to participate in the Discussion Forum, you will have to register with a username and a valid email address.

Please note: the only part of this site that requires registration is the Discussion Forum. You do not need to register an account in order to read the blog, post a comment to a blog entry, search the database, view the galleries, and so on. Registration is required only for participation in the Discussion Forum.

NLI Parish Registers Digitisation Project

This is huge. This is absolutely fantastic. This has the potential to transform (and by “transform,” I mean radically improve) Irish family history research.

Press release from the National Library of Ireland:

We are delighted to announce that we will make the NLI’s entire collection of Catholic parish register microfilms available online – for free – by summer 2015…

…Commenting today, Colette O’Flaherty, Head of Special Collections at the NLI, said: “This is the most ambitious digitisation project in the history of the NLI, and our most significant ever genealogy project. We believe it will be of huge assistance to those who wish to research their family history. At this stage, we have converted the microfilm reels on which the registers are recorded into approximately 390,000 digital images. We will be making all these images available, for free, on a dedicated website, which will be launched in summer 2015.

More on this in a later post.

Ireland-to-Canada emigration: from which port?

According to historian Timothy J. Meagher (The Columbia Guide to Irish American History), Liverpool was the point of departure for the vast majority of Irish emigrants to both Canada and the United States, at least during the Famine period:

Even most of the Irish bound for North America, however, first went through Britain, more specifically Liverpool. By the mid-1840s, over 90 percent of the Irish going to Canada or the United States went through Liverpool and over one million Irish passed through the city between 1847 and 1853.1

And how did these Irish emigrants get from Ireland to Liverpool, before embarking on their journey to the New World? By steam ferry, before crossing the Atlantic by sail. “It was not an easy trip,” writes Meagher. Indeed.

Was Liverpool the main point of departure to North America for pre-Famine Irish emgrants to Canada? This I do not know (but I suspect Liverpool was also an important port for Ireland-to-Canada emigrants from the 1820s to the early 1840s).

  1.  Timothy J. Meagher, The Columbia Guide to Irish American History (New York: Columbia University Press, 2005), 75.

Slow-to-no blogging for the next month or so

So many half-finished drafts of blog entries (about 5 or 6, I guess), so little time. And, eh, I just noticed that I didn’t post anything at all for the month of August. And I am very much behind in replying to emails and feedback posts. No excuses, just apologies.

Currently feeling a bit swamped by teaching and by other writing projects. Hope to get back to the blog in October.

Go west (and then north), young man

dad frobisher bay

(Click on the above image to see a larger version of the .jpeg file).

My dad, John Alexander Moran (right) at Frobisher Bay, late 1950s.

He said that he just went out west, presented himself to the office of the geological survey, and they hired him — by telling him to buy several items, including these boots and jacket, and then to come back for transport.

Best blog pseudonym ever

Pierre_François_Xavier_Charlevoix

Pierre François Xavier de Charlevoix (1682-1761), French Jesuit traveller and historian. Wikipedia Commons.

P.-F-X., for Pierre François-Xavier de Charlevoix (1682-1761), blogs at Charlevoix: Blogue de la Nouvelle-France – A Blog About New France.

Pierre François-Xavier de Charlevoix was an eighteenth-century Jesuit priest, voyageur, teacher, and historian who is best remembered for his Histoire et description générale de la Nouvelle France (1744). He is considered one of the first historians of New France.

It’s great to see him circulating in the twenty-first-century blogosphere!

Link

Canadian historical newspapers online: a great collection of links at Kenneth R. Marks’ The Ancestor Hunt.