M.C. Moran

John Leavy and Jane Byrne

My 3x great-grandparents Jane Byrne (born about 1811, died after April 1881) and John Leavy (1801-1881):

leavey_john_byrne_jane.jpg

John Leavy’s headstone (Indian Hill RC Cemetery, Pakenham, Lanark Co.) identifies him as “a native of Co. Longford, Ireland;” Jane Byrne was presumably also a native of that Irish county.
This couple married about 1830 in Ireland (presumably Co. Longford), and had three children (Patrick; Mary Ann [my great-great-grandmother]); and James) born in Ireland; before emigrating to Upper Canada around 1834, where they settled at Pakenham, Lanark Co., Ontario, and had six more children (Thomas; Ellen; John; Michael; Jane; Elizabeth).
John Leavy’s last will and testament transcribed here.
Mary Ann Leavy married Alexander (“Sandy”) Michael Moran, son of James Moran and Margaret Jamieson.

Honora (“Annie”) McDonald/McDonnell (1841-1914)

My great-great-grandmother Honora (“Ann,” “Annie”) McDonald (or possibly McDonnell?).
Born about 1841 (April 1841 according to the 1911 Canadian census) in Co. Clare, Ireland, the daughter of Patrick McDonald (or McDonnell?) and Catherine Dea. Apparently emigrated to Canada as a young girl (late 1840s to mid-1850s?). Her first husband was a David Mahoney (also born Co. Clare), who died about 1867 at Smiths Falls, Lanark Co., Ontario, leaving her a widow with three young daughters. She then married (21 March 1872) Eugene McCarthy (born about 1834 at Farranamanagh, Kilcrohane, Co. Cork, Ireland), whose first wife Catherine Traynor/Treanor had died in 1871, leaving him a widower with four young children.
Eugene McCarthy and Honora McDonald/McDonnell had two daughters: Ellen McCarthy (who married John Fowler) and Catherine Honora McCarthy (my great-grandmother, who married Arthur Joseph McGlade).
Honora (McDonald/McDonnell) McCarthy died at Toledo, Leeds Co., Ontario on 19 April 1914. She is buried at St. Frances de Sales Cemetery in Smiths Falls, Lanark Co., Ontario, with her first husband David Mahoney.

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Paper of Record Returns (Subscription Only)

Paper of Record used to be available (free of charge) at its own site; was then purchased by Google, which apparently had some “scan quality and permission issues;” and was then available through World Vital Records(but no longer).

It’s now available at its own site again, but only through paid subscription/membership. Worth it for me at the moment, since it allows me to go through decades and decades of the Perth Courier.
Some of the scans aren’t great, though, which means that the search function won’t always work very well. For example, a search of the Perth Courier, using a start date of 1856, December, 12, with “McGlade” in the “Search for” box, turns up nothing (“Your search has not returned any results”). But I know that the name “McGlade” can be found on page 1 of the Perth Courier, 12 December 1856, where John McGlade is listed as a Defendant in a case of “Breach of Peace on Sabbath,” for which offense he was convicted and fined one pound (see this post for details). And how did I know that “McGlade” could be found on that page, given that the Paper of Record search box turned up nothing? Because I went through the paper the old-fashioned way (but online, and in digitized format, so: new-fashioned too!), page by page, month by month, and etc. Which the Paper of Record allows you to do, even when its search function comes up blank.


Kenneth O’Hara and Wilda Derouin: Wedding Photo

A few weeks ago, I got an email from a reader who is connected (by marriage) to my paternal family tree through the Delaney family; and who is also connected to my maternal family tree through the Derouin family. Well, it’s a bit convoluted and complicated, except perhaps when represented in the form of a pie graph; but basically, when my dad was a kid, he lived at the address (on Holland Ave., in Ottawa) where this reader’s Ireland-to-Canada ancestors had died; owing to, amongst other factors, my dad’s great-aunt Mary Emilia (“Em, Emma”) Moran having married this reader’s great-uncle Ed Delaney, after having been widowed by the untimely death of her first husband Thomas Lenahan. And then, just to make things interesting (you’re still following?), this reader’s father had a brother who married a cousin of my maternal grandmother Delia Lucie Derouin.

Six degrees of separation? For the Ottawa Valley, it’s typically more like two or three.
Said reader sent me a wonderful photograph, dated 27 September 1947, and taken on the steps of St. Pat’s (then Church, now Basilica), on the occasion of the marriage of Kenneth O’Hara to Esther Wilda Derouin:
Kenneth O'Hara Wedding.jpg
A key to the above photograph (so cool, this):
Kenneth O'Hara Wedding Master.jpg

Emmet/Emmett as First or Middle Name

One of the things I love about TNG (The Next Generation of Genealogy Sitebuilding) is its powerful search capacity. Once you’ve entered some data into your TNG-based genealogy database, you can quickly and easily perform all kinds of searches based on any number of criteria. Cause of death contains “tuberculosis,” for example, gives me this list (which almost certainly underrepresents the actual number of tuberculosis victims in my database, since I either have not discovered or have not entered the cause of death for many, many individuals). Birth place “Arnprior,” to give another example, produces this list(96 individuals, many of them Cunninghams, Finnertys and Galligans, and with 16 surnames represented overall).

I’ve already written of my family tree’s “Loreto/Loretto as girl’s middle name” mini-trend, which began around 1860 and peaked around 1900 or so.

George Dolan: Home Child

In the 1901 census of Nepean, Carleton Co., Ontario, the household of Father John Andrew Sloan includes his nephew Hugh Sloan, age 12, born Quebec (probably Vinton, Pontiac Co.); a housekeeper named Hannah Ludgate, age 46, born New York; and a George Dolan, age 21, born England. George Dolan’s birthdate is listed as 14 January 1880; his racial or tribal origin as Irish; his religion as Roman Catholic; and his year of immigration as 1890. His occupation is that of General Servant, and his relationship to the head of the household (Rev. J.A. Sloan) is that of a domestic.
This is very possibly the George Dolan, age 10, who emigrated from Liverpool to Québec in the spring of 1888, as one of a “Party of 117 Souls from the Catholic Protection Society of Liverpool,” in the charge of a Mrs Lacy.
So, if he was in Canada by 1888, or at least by 1890 (according to the 1901 census), can George Dolan be located in the 1891 Canadian census? It looks like he can be:
The 1891 enumeration of Nepean, Carleton Co., Ontario, includes a Geo. Dolan, age 9, Dom [Domestic], born Eng [England], father born England, mother born England, religion RC, in the household of a Patrick Watters (age 82, born Ireland). George Dolan’s occupation listed here as Servant. You know, 1891 wasn’t so very long ago (the day before yesterday, really, when thinking of the grand sweep of time), and yet this seems like another time and place, and another world, entirely. I have a 9-year old son, and….well, I guess I can’t even imagine.
And in the 1911 census? Well, this begins to look like a Home Child story that did not end well (and many of them did not, of course), though I hope there were some later, and happier, chapters. In the 1911 enumeration of Elizabethtown township, Brockville, Ontario, there is a George Dolan listed as an “inmate” at the asylum at Brockville: place of habitation Ottawa, year of birth 1880, age 30, place of birth England, year of immigration “not known,” racial or tribal origin English, nationality Canadian, religion RC [Roman Catholic], occupation laborer. 

Ann Lahy/Lahey, wife of William Coil/Coyle

On 29 September 1846, William Coil/Coyle, son of Thomas Coil and Ann Wellworth “du comte de Tipperary” (of the county of Tipperary), married Ann Lahy, daughter of John Lahy and Ann Fitzpatrick, also of Tipperary (“du même comte”/of the same county). Witnesses to the marriage were John Doherty (Dogherty/O’Dogherty) and James [Brogan? Bingham?]. Marriage record found in the parish register for Notre Dame Basilica, Ottawa:

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Ottawa; Ottawa (basilique Notre Dame), Register of Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1845-1847, M. 81 (1846), Wm Coil and Ann Lahy, image 98 of 181, Ancestry.ca (http://ancestry.ca/: accessed 3 April 2011), Ontario, Canada, Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1747-1967.

Given the common surname and the common county of origin, along with their shared settlement in the Bytown area, I wonder if this Ann Lahy was related to my Lahy/Lahey ancestors who emigrated to March township (Carleton Co., Ontario) from Ballymacegan, Lorrha, Co. Tipperary?

Bridget Loretto Killeen, with daughter and grandson

Photo presumably taken in Ottawa, late 1920s.

Bridget Loretto Killeen (1861-1932), daughter of Patrick Killeen and Bridget Galligan and wife of John James Lahey; with daughter Mary Gladys Lahey (1901-1959), wife of Richard John Anthony Cunningham (1900-1959); and a grandson (probably John Cunningham [1926-early 1990s]; but possibly Robert L. Cunningham [1928-1959]). Click thumbnail preview to see larger image:
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Richard J.A. Cunningham (originally of Arnprior, Renfrew Co., Ontario) and Mary Gladys Lahey (originally of Ottawa, Carleton Co. Ontario) lived first in Detroit, Michigan, before settling in South Bend, Indiana. They died on 11 July 1959, along with two of their four children (Robert L. and Mary Ann Cunningham), the victims of a horrible auto accident: a head-on collision about a mile from Three Rivers, Michigan.
When I asked my father about this accident, he remembered the date exactly.