M.C. Moran

George Dolan: Home Child

In the 1901 census of Nepean, Carleton Co., Ontario, the household of Father John Andrew Sloan includes his nephew Hugh Sloan, age 12, born Quebec (probably Vinton, Pontiac Co.); a housekeeper named Hannah Ludgate, age 46, born New York; and a George Dolan, age 21, born England. George Dolan’s birthdate is listed as 14 January 1880; his racial or tribal origin as Irish; his religion as Roman Catholic; and his year of immigration as 1890. His occupation is that of General Servant, and his relationship to the head of the household (Rev. J.A. Sloan) is that of a domestic.
This is very possibly the George Dolan, age 10, who emigrated from Liverpool to Québec in the spring of 1888, as one of a “Party of 117 Souls from the Catholic Protection Society of Liverpool,” in the charge of a Mrs Lacy.
So, if he was in Canada by 1888, or at least by 1890 (according to the 1901 census), can George Dolan be located in the 1891 Canadian census? It looks like he can be:
The 1891 enumeration of Nepean, Carleton Co., Ontario, includes a Geo. Dolan, age 9, Dom [Domestic], born Eng [England], father born England, mother born England, religion RC, in the household of a Patrick Watters (age 82, born Ireland). George Dolan’s occupation listed here as Servant. You know, 1891 wasn’t so very long ago (the day before yesterday, really, when thinking of the grand sweep of time), and yet this seems like another time and place, and another world, entirely. I have a 9-year old son, and….well, I guess I can’t even imagine.
And in the 1911 census? Well, this begins to look like a Home Child story that did not end well (and many of them did not, of course), though I hope there were some later, and happier, chapters. In the 1911 enumeration of Elizabethtown township, Brockville, Ontario, there is a George Dolan listed as an “inmate” at the asylum at Brockville: place of habitation Ottawa, year of birth 1880, age 30, place of birth England, year of immigration “not known,” racial or tribal origin English, nationality Canadian, religion RC [Roman Catholic], occupation laborer. 

Ann Lahy/Lahey, wife of William Coil/Coyle

On 29 September 1846, William Coil/Coyle, son of Thomas Coil and Ann Wellworth “du comte de Tipperary” (of the county of Tipperary), married Ann Lahy, daughter of John Lahy and Ann Fitzpatrick, also of Tipperary (“du même comte”/of the same county). Witnesses to the marriage were John Doherty (Dogherty/O’Dogherty) and James [Brogan? Bingham?]. Marriage record found in the parish register for Notre Dame Basilica, Ottawa:

annlahey_wmcoyle_1846marriage_notredame.jpg

Ottawa; Ottawa (basilique Notre Dame), Register of Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1845-1847, M. 81 (1846), Wm Coil and Ann Lahy, image 98 of 181, Ancestry.ca (http://ancestry.ca/: accessed 3 April 2011), Ontario, Canada, Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1747-1967.

Given the common surname and the common county of origin, along with their shared settlement in the Bytown area, I wonder if this Ann Lahy was related to my Lahy/Lahey ancestors who emigrated to March township (Carleton Co., Ontario) from Ballymacegan, Lorrha, Co. Tipperary?

Bridget Loretto Killeen, with daughter and grandson

Photo presumably taken in Ottawa, late 1920s.

Bridget Loretto Killeen (1861-1932), daughter of Patrick Killeen and Bridget Galligan and wife of John James Lahey; with daughter Mary Gladys Lahey (1901-1959), wife of Richard John Anthony Cunningham (1900-1959); and a grandson (probably John Cunningham [1926-early 1990s]; but possibly Robert L. Cunningham [1928-1959]). Click thumbnail preview to see larger image:
bridget_loreto_killeen.jpg
Richard J.A. Cunningham (originally of Arnprior, Renfrew Co., Ontario) and Mary Gladys Lahey (originally of Ottawa, Carleton Co. Ontario) lived first in Detroit, Michigan, before settling in South Bend, Indiana. They died on 11 July 1959, along with two of their four children (Robert L. and Mary Ann Cunningham), the victims of a horrible auto accident: a head-on collision about a mile from Three Rivers, Michigan.
When I asked my father about this accident, he remembered the date exactly.

Patrick Cavanaugh and Bridget Killeen

Another Killeen couple with surprisingly few marriages amongst their offspring:

Bridget Killeen was one of the daughters (possibly the fourth daughter, and fifth child) of Denis Killeen and Mary Ahearn, and a sister of Hanora (married Michael Donahue), and also of Ellen (married Mathew Daley), of Patrick (married Bridget Galligan), of Margaret Jane (married John Lahey), of John (married Margaret Fahey), and of five other known siblings. She was born at March township about 1827, and died at Maniwaki, Gatineau Co., Québec in 1910.
On 2 May 1854 (Notre Dame, Bytown), Bridget Killeen married Patrick Cavanaugh, son of Christopher Cavanaugh and Jane Malone, and an emigrant from Co. Kildare, Ireland. The couple lived in March township, Carleton Co., Ontario for the next six to eight years, where they had five known children (Mary Jane; Margaret; John Christopher; William; and Anna Esther), before moving to Maniwaki, where they had another three known children (James Patrick; Denis Joseph; and Albert). Patrick Cavanaugh was a blacksmith, as were his sons John, William, and James, according to the 1881 census (Quebec, Ottawa, Egan and Maniwaki, household of Patrick Kavanagh, family no. 15; LAC; click thumbnail to see larger image):
cavanaugh_patrick_killeen_bridget_1881census.jpg

Mocavo (New Genealogy Search Engine)

Via Deborah Large Fox, a new genealogy search engine called Mocavo. As Deborah Large Fox points out, since Mocavo scours only genealogy-related sites, and therefore filters out genealogically irrelevant results, it has the potential to be quite useful to family history researchers, though the usual cautions apply (in general, the genealogical information that you find on the internet will range in quality from impressively accurate and well-sourced to fundamentally conjectural and probably inaccurate, if impressively fanciful; and the more you already know about an individual or a family, the better able you will be to parse the distinctions between “true,” “false,” “possibly true,” “almost certainly false,” and etc., more finely. So: the more you already know, the more you can subsequently discover? Well, yeah, basically, but of course this logic is by no means confined to genealogy…).

I first tried “Denis Killeen” at Mocavo (in quotes, to narrow it down a bit to only a Killeen associated with the name of Denis), and was, frankly, a bit surprised to find the first seven search results, and also the ninth, directly related to the Denis Killeen that I had in mind. My second trial, of “James Moran,” was far less successful; but after all, the Moran surname is as common as a garden flower, and the forename of James doesn’t exactly help to identify a special or unusual plant species, so I guess I can’t hold this failure against the new search engine. Mocavo is definitely worth a try.

Michael Donahue and Hanora Killeen: 12 Children, 1 Marriage?

Hanora (sometimes Anna or Hanna/Hannah) Killeen was one of the eldest (perhaps the second eldest) daughters of Denis Killeen and Mary Ahearn. She was born in March township in the early 1820s, possibly (as per the 1901 Canadian census return) on 10 May 1821.

Hanora’s older sister Ellen Killeen (born Ireland about 1818) married a “Matthew Daly of Huntley” (born Ireland about 1807) in 1836 (Notre Dame, Bytown/Ottawa). Matthew Daley and Ellen Killeen had a very large family, with their first four children (Peter, Mary, Denis, and John) born in Huntley township (Carleton Co., Ontario/Upper Canada), and their sixth and later children born at Clarendon, Pontiac Co., Québec/Lower Canada. It’s not clear where their fifth child, Bridget, was born (whether at Huntley or at Clarendon), but certainly they were living in Clarendon by 1847. (Some of their sons, including Anthony Daley, later emigrated to the States.)
Hanora Killeen had presumably moved from March township to Clarendon to be with her older sister, for by 1850 she was described as being “domiciled at Clarendon.”

Border Crossings (Daleys): Anthony Daley

Anthony Daley was born at Clarendon, Pontiac Co., Québec in March 1863, and baptized (Ste. Anne, Calumet Island) on 5 April 1863, with Michael Hughes and Elizabeth McCullough serving as godparents. He was the eleventh son and fifteenth child of Matthew Daley and Ellen Killeen.

He emigrated to the US (Michigan or Wisconsin) around 1880, perhaps with several of his brothers, and presumably to work in the lumbering trade. By 1895, he was a resident of Florence County, Wisconsin.
On 2 October 1895, at Norway, Dickinson Co., Michigan, Anthony Daley married Mary O’Donnell, daughter of John O’Donnell and Bridget Kale. From the Michigan Marriages, 1868-1925 database at FamilySearch, here is the civil registration of their (RC, performed by a priest named F.X. Bastien) marriage (click preview to see larger image):
daley_anthony_odonnell_mary_marriage.jpg
Anthony Daley and Mary O’Donnell had a family of at least seven children, with their eldest child, a daughter named Donalda,* born in Michigan, and the other children all born in Wisconsin. They seem to have moved from Michigan to Wisconsin, and then back to Michigan.
How many of Anthony Daley’s brothers also emigrated to the States? In the 1910 US federal census for Waucedah, Dickinson, Michigan (sheet no. 2, family no. 22) Anthony (now Andrew) Daly and wife Mary can be found with six children (Denalda, Gerald, Vivien, Wayne, Anthony, and Debbe [listed here as a son, but possibly daughter Kathleen B.?), and with Anthony/Andrew’s widowed brother James, widower of Mary McHugh, listed as a “Retired Farmer.” Brother Dominic Daley may have ended up in Missoula, Montana. And brother Christopher Daley may have also emigrated to Michigan to marry an Ellen. In the 1880 US federal census for the township of Fraser, Bay County, Michigan, three brothers Christopher, Thomas and Patrick Daly, all born Canada and the dates seem to fit, are found working as Laborers in a lumber camp.
*One of my high school teachers (grade 10, homeroom) was a nun named Sister Donalda. I recall thinking at the time (o callow youth!…) that Donalda was sort of a funny name for a female. In retrospect, I remember her as a truly kind person, if sometimes a little bit cranky, and as an excellent history teacher. Viewing the 1900 US federal census return for Anthony Daly and wife Mary, with children Denalda, Gerrald, and Vivian C. (Wisconsin, Brown, Green Bay Ward 6, sheet no. 12, family no. 224) is the second time ever I have come across the name Donalda.