M.C. Moran

Who was Jennie Stafford?

Found in the household of John Sullivan and Mary Ann Galligan in the 1901 census for Arnprior, Renfrew Co., Ontario:

Stafford, Jennie, Adopted, born 1891 (no day or month given), age 9, place of birth Ontario, racial or tribal origin Irish, nationality Canadian, religion Roman Catholic, attending school 10 months in the year.*
This family had a daughter Mary Catharine Sullivan, born 1891 (so: roughly the same age as Jennie Stafford), who died of nephritis at age 9, in December 1899. Did they adopt (which is to say, informally adopt) Jennie Stafford after the death of their daughter of the same age? Certainly, this family had no shortage of children, with five known sons, four of them still living in 1901, but with only one other daughter, Ellen, born 1880, and listed as age 19 in the 1901 enumeration.
Jennie Stafford is not found in the Sullivan-Galligan household in the 1911 census.
Was she indeed born in Ontario, as listed in the 1901 census, or was she born in England and “adopted” by this family as a Home Child?
*1901 Census of Canada, Ontario, Renfrew (South/Sud), District Number 111, Arnprior (Town/Ville), Subdistrict B-1, p. 9.

Patrick Kenny: Home Child

Found in the household of John Scissons and Hannah O’Malley in the 1891 census of March township, Carleton Co., Ontario:

Patrick Kenny, age 20, born about 1871 in England, father born England, mother born England, religion Roman Catholic, occupation Farm Labour.
This is very possibly the same Patrick Kenny who emigrated from England to Canada in 1886, at the age of 15, travelling from Liverpool to Québec with Ottawa as the destination.
It may also be the same Patrick Kenny who married Mary Moylan, daughter of John Moylan and Margaret Birmingham and widow of John Walsh, at St. Mary’s (Notre Dame du bon Conseil), Ottawa on 7 January 1919. The marriage records lists him as “Patrick Kenny, born in England, laborer, son of age (47) of John Kenny and Elisabeth Murray.” The Ontario civil registration of this marriage lists Patrick Kenny’s birthplace as Wolwich, England, and Maria [Moylan] Welch’s birthplace as South March, Ontario.

Hanorah Ryan’s Death Records

RC Burial Record and Ontario Civil Registration

If you’re looking for Catholic ancestors, the parish register, if available, will be a very important, and in many cases the most important, source of genealogical information.
Because the RC records typically supply maiden names (of the mother of an infant in the case of a baptism; of both the bride’s and the groom’s mothers in the case of a marriage; and of a married or widowed decedent in the case of a burial), it’s the Catholic parish register that will enable you to most easily and reliably reconstruct your family along both paternal and maternal lines. Moreover, the names of sponsors and witnesses (godparents, marriage witnesses and burial witnesses) can often help shed light on significant (but otherwise poorly document) familial connections. And for Irish Catholic ancestors in the Ottawa Valley area, the marriage records of first- and second-generation emigrants will occasionally supply the name of a county and perhaps even a parish in Ireland (and this even when the priest recording the information was not Irish but French Canadian).

In Remembrance: James Michael McGlade (1905-1944)

James Michael McGlade was born at Perth, Co. Lanark, Ontario on 17 September 1905, the son of Patrick McGlade and Elizabeth (“Lizzie”) Cahill. He died in the Second World War, at the age of 39.

One of my mother’s older sisters remembers cousin Michael (James Michael) coming over to their house to say good-bye before heading out overseas.

James Michael McGlade was a Corporal in the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry, R.C.I.C. (Royal Canadian Infantry Corps). He died in action in Belgium on 3 October 1944, and is buried at the Schoonselfhof Cemetery in Antwerp, Belgium. There is also a grave marker at St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Cemetery in Perth, Ontario, Canada. He is commemorated on page 386 of Veterans Affairs Canada’s Second World War Book of Remembrance.

Immense Forests (Upper Canada, 1838)

BAnQ (Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec) has an excellent online collection of maps of Québec, with some other regions covered as well. 

Here, for example, is James Wyld’s A Map of the Province of Upper Canada (London: 1838). I especially like the detail which indicates the various points of portage, which warns that “This River [the Ottawa River] has a great many Rapids,” and which describes the vast tract of land that would later become Renfrew County as, simply (and no doubt accurately), “Immense Forests.” See inset below (and click on thumbnail to view larger image):

map_uppercanada_1838.jpg

Digitization of Irish RC Parish Records?

In his Irish Roots column of 25 October, John Grenham writes of the NLI’s plans to digitize its collection of RC parish records:
The National Library has recently put out a request for tender for the digitisation of all of its Roman Catholic parish register microfilms. These microfilms cover 98% of the pre-1880 baptism, marriage and burial records kept by local parishes on the entire island, and are the single most important source of family history information for the vast majority of researchers. Indeed, in most cases they are the only source of family information before the start of state registration in 1864. They cover almost 1200 parishes on 520 reels and represent one of the most enduring achievements of the National Library between the 1950s and the 1970s. Having them available on-line will revolutionise Irish research.
Honestly, I don’t think “revolutionise” is too hyperbolic a term to use here. This really would change everything about Irish genealogical research (and would no doubt have a major impact on some other kinds of Irish historical research too: e.g., parish-level social history).
I’m not sure about the status of a “request for tender,” though. Is this a sure thing? Can it really be funded, what with budgetary cutbacks and so on? I sure hope so! 

Surgeons’ Journals from 8 Ireland to Upper Canada ships, 1825

New (or Newly Available Online) Peter Robinson Settlers Source
Olive Tree Genealogy is extracting the names of Irish passengers found in medical journals pertaining to eight ships (John Barry; Amity; Elizabeth; Star; Regulus; Fortitude; Brunswick; and Albion) which sailed from Cork to Québec in the spring and summer of 1825. These eight ships were part of the second wave (1825) of the Peter Robinson settlement. More details here.
Olive Tree Genealogy notes that:
Two of the ships medical journals are available online as a .pdf file at the National Archives UK website. The other medical journals are available for a free from the National Archives UK website.
Absolutely wonderful source for anyone researching PR ancestors.

Some (Adult Male) Roman Catholics of Huntley township, 1837

The following petition contains the names of 88 adult male Catholics of Huntley township (Carleton Co., Ontario [Upper Canada]), circa 1837. This is not a complete inventory of RC males, or of RC male heads of household, in Huntley township at that time (among the names that I was expecting/hoping to find, but which do show up here, are Moran, Hogan, and Cahill, for example). It is a list only of those men in and around the Huntley area who signed on to the petition.

While most of the names below were written by the same hand, a few of the men appear to have signed their own names. In transcribing the names, I have not attempted to “correct” the spellings, which vary considerably even for the same name within the same document (which is typical of pre-twentieth century documents, of course). A few of the names I found difficult to make out, in which cases I have given my best guess.
Some of the names (e.g., Mantil/Mantle, certainly; but possibly also Allen, Buckley, Forrest, Gregg, Roach/Roche, and no doubt some others) are names associated with the Peter Robinson Settlers.

Moran household, 1842

From the 1842 census of Huntley township, Carleton Co., Ontario (Upper Canada),1  a snapshot of the household of James Moran and Margaret Jamieson.

This census lists only the head of household by name (here Jas. [=James] Morin [=Moran]); other members are counted under various headings having to do with sex, place of birth, and religion.
While James and Margaret had 10 children (7 daughters and 3 sons), only 7 of them (5 daughters and 2 sons) are counted here. Eldest daughter Marcella had already moved away from the household when she married John Hogan in 1838; but this still leaves one daughter unaccounted for. Possibly second youngest daughter Anna (born 1834) had died by 1842? She is certainly not found with her parents in the 1851 census. I’m not sure why only two of three sons were enumerated in 1842. James (Jr., born about 1824) died of cholera in 1851; while Thomas (never married) and Alexander (“Sandy”) Michael died of “la grippe” within a week of one another, in January 1892. Sandy Moran went up to the White Lake district near Pakenham shortly after his marriage to Mary Ann Leavy, before returning to the Moran farm at Concession I, Lot 11 at Huntley township; Thomas almost certainly never left the Moran homestead at Huntley.

Apparently the Morans in 1842 had 5 hogs, but neither horses nor cattle. They grew oats and potatoes, mainly.
1. Houses Inhabited 1
4. Name of the Head of Each Family Jas. Morin
5. Proprietor of Real Property Jas. Morin
8. Trade/Profession Farmer
12. Number of natives of Ireland belonging to each family 2
15. Number of natives of Canada belonging to each family of British origin 7
18. Number of years each person has been in the Province when not natives thereof 21
21. Female. /five years of age and under. 1
22. Male. \Number of persons in the family above 2
23. Female. /five and under fourteen years of age. 4
30. Married. \MALE 30 and not 60. 1
34. Married. \FEMALE 14 and not 45 1
48. Number of persons in each family belonging to the Church of Rome 9
69. Number of acres or arpents of land occupied by each family. 200
70. Number of acres or arpents of improved land occupied by each family. 20
71.* Wheat. 40
74.* Oats. 100
78.* Potatoes. 500
84. Hogs. 5
122. Concession Number 1
*Produce raised by each family during the year, and estimated in Winchester Bushels.

1 J.M. Robinson, 1842 Census, Canada West, Carleton County (Ottawa: Ontario Genealogical Society, 2000).