M.C. Moran

Surgeons’ Journals from 8 Ireland to Upper Canada ships, 1825

New (or Newly Available Online) Peter Robinson Settlers Source
Olive Tree Genealogy is extracting the names of Irish passengers found in medical journals pertaining to eight ships (John Barry; Amity; Elizabeth; Star; Regulus; Fortitude; Brunswick; and Albion) which sailed from Cork to Québec in the spring and summer of 1825. These eight ships were part of the second wave (1825) of the Peter Robinson settlement. More details here.
Olive Tree Genealogy notes that:
Two of the ships medical journals are available online as a .pdf file at the National Archives UK website. The other medical journals are available for a free from the National Archives UK website.
Absolutely wonderful source for anyone researching PR ancestors.

Some (Adult Male) Roman Catholics of Huntley township, 1837

The following petition contains the names of 88 adult male Catholics of Huntley township (Carleton Co., Ontario [Upper Canada]), circa 1837. This is not a complete inventory of RC males, or of RC male heads of household, in Huntley township at that time (among the names that I was expecting/hoping to find, but which do show up here, are Moran, Hogan, and Cahill, for example). It is a list only of those men in and around the Huntley area who signed on to the petition.

While most of the names below were written by the same hand, a few of the men appear to have signed their own names. In transcribing the names, I have not attempted to “correct” the spellings, which vary considerably even for the same name within the same document (which is typical of pre-twentieth century documents, of course). A few of the names I found difficult to make out, in which cases I have given my best guess.
Some of the names (e.g., Mantil/Mantle, certainly; but possibly also Allen, Buckley, Forrest, Gregg, Roach/Roche, and no doubt some others) are names associated with the Peter Robinson Settlers.

Moran household, 1842

From the 1842 census of Huntley township, Carleton Co., Ontario (Upper Canada),1  a snapshot of the household of James Moran and Margaret Jamieson.

This census lists only the head of household by name (here Jas. [=James] Morin [=Moran]); other members are counted under various headings having to do with sex, place of birth, and religion.
While James and Margaret had 10 children (7 daughters and 3 sons), only 7 of them (5 daughters and 2 sons) are counted here. Eldest daughter Marcella had already moved away from the household when she married John Hogan in 1838; but this still leaves one daughter unaccounted for. Possibly second youngest daughter Anna (born 1834) had died by 1842? She is certainly not found with her parents in the 1851 census. I’m not sure why only two of three sons were enumerated in 1842. James (Jr., born about 1824) died of cholera in 1851; while Thomas (never married) and Alexander (“Sandy”) Michael died of “la grippe” within a week of one another, in January 1892. Sandy Moran went up to the White Lake district near Pakenham shortly after his marriage to Mary Ann Leavy, before returning to the Moran farm at Concession I, Lot 11 at Huntley township; Thomas almost certainly never left the Moran homestead at Huntley.

Apparently the Morans in 1842 had 5 hogs, but neither horses nor cattle. They grew oats and potatoes, mainly.
1. Houses Inhabited 1
4. Name of the Head of Each Family Jas. Morin
5. Proprietor of Real Property Jas. Morin
8. Trade/Profession Farmer
12. Number of natives of Ireland belonging to each family 2
15. Number of natives of Canada belonging to each family of British origin 7
18. Number of years each person has been in the Province when not natives thereof 21
21. Female. /five years of age and under. 1
22. Male. \Number of persons in the family above 2
23. Female. /five and under fourteen years of age. 4
30. Married. \MALE 30 and not 60. 1
34. Married. \FEMALE 14 and not 45 1
48. Number of persons in each family belonging to the Church of Rome 9
69. Number of acres or arpents of land occupied by each family. 200
70. Number of acres or arpents of improved land occupied by each family. 20
71.* Wheat. 40
74.* Oats. 100
78.* Potatoes. 500
84. Hogs. 5
122. Concession Number 1
*Produce raised by each family during the year, and estimated in Winchester Bushels.

1 J.M. Robinson, 1842 Census, Canada West, Carleton County (Ottawa: Ontario Genealogical Society, 2000).

A Visit to Brother André’s Shrine

Canada’s “‘Rocket Richard’ of religion” has been canonized.
Here’s a photograph from the mid-1950s, of a visit to Brother André’s shrine (St. Joseph’s Oratory, Montreal). The photo shows my grandparents, with my grandmother’s cousin Clifford Lahey and his wife Stella McDonnell.  From left to right: Clifford Lahey, Mary Catherine Lahey, Stella McDonnell, Allan Jerome Moran.
Click thumbnail preview to see larger image:

brotherandresshrine.jpg

Cause of Death: Childbirth?

Mary McCourt, wife of “Con” (short for either Constantine or Cornelius: the records differ on this point) Hazelton, died at Brudenell, Renfrew Co., Ontario on 13 May 1907. Her Ontario civil death record lists the cause of death as “heart failure, two weeks duration,” and records the name of A.T. Gourlay as the physician in attendance.

What the death record doesn’t note is that eight days earlier, on 5 May 1907, Mary McCourt had given birth to her sixth and youngest child, Mary Margaret Constance Hazelton.

Occupation: Inmate

Search tip: If someone’sU.S. World War I Draft Registration card lists his occupation as “Twine worker” and his address as the Minnesota State Prison in Stillwater, Minn., the guy’s an inmate at the prison.

Here’s a photograph (Minnesota Historical Society, Photograph Collection 1925) of the twine factory at the Stillwater Prison. More photographs and background information (.PDF file): James Taylor Dunn, “The Minnesota State Prison during the Stillwater Era, 1853-1914,” Minnesota History, December 1960 (Minnesota Historical Society).

Albert Austin Massey: Home Child

Albert Austin Massey was born in London, England about 1884,* the son of Thomas Massey and Mary Armitage (his parents’ names come from his RC parish marriage record, and also from the Ontario civil marriage record which was based on that parish register). He emigrated to Canada around 1895 (at about 10 or 11 years of age), where he ended up in Renfrew Co., Ontario.

On 4 July 1900, at the Church of St Anne, Sebastopol, Renfrew Co. (record found in the parish register for Our Lady of Holy Angels, Brudenell), Albert Massey made his Confirmation, at which point he was described as “adopted by Frank Kilby,” age 13. He is found in the household of Francis Kilby in the 1901 Canadian census (Ontario, Renfrew South/Sud, Sebastopol, household number 39, pages 5-6), where he is listed as Massey, Albert, Male, Domestic, Single, born 2 Aug 1886, age 14, country of birth England, year of immigration 1895, racial or tribal origin English (the other members of this household are Irish in origin), nationality Canadian, religion R. Cath. [Roman Catholic], occupation Servant. Next door to the Kilby household, or next field over, perhaps, or very close by, at any rate, at household number 40, was the family of William Killeen and Lucy Armstrong.
Albert Massey married the above Lucy Armstrong on 6 May 1909 (Our Lady of Holy Angels, Brudenell).

Brennan-Connelly Query

On 12 February 1870 (Ste. Anne, Calumet Island/l’Île du Grand Calumet, Pontiac Co., Québec) Thomas Brennan, son of Patrick Brennan and Matilda Shirley, married Susanna Connelly, daughter of John Connelly and Ellen Cahill. This couple then seems to disappear from the Canadian records. Did they emigrate to Leadville, Colorado?

The 1880 US federal census for Leadville, Lake, Colorado has a T.W. Brennan (age 37, born Canada), with wife Susan (age 33, born Canada), and children Shirley [male], Delacey, Mary, D. [?] and Margaret. The names Shirley and Delacey (here given as first names) are surnames found in the family trees of Thomas Brennan and Susanna Connelly, respectively.

James Lewis: Home Child?

I came across the following record of an abjuration and baptism in the parish register for St. Isidore, South March (Carleton Co., Ontario):

On the twenty sixth day of January one thousand eight hundred and eighty three, I the undersigned curate of this mission baptized James born about the month of January (in England) Eleven years ago of the lawful marriage of Mr Lewis and a mother whose name cannot be arrived at. The godfather was James Kirwan and the godmother Mary Kirwan. J.A. Sloan, pt.1
I don’t know anything about the Kirwans, except that they were Irish Catholic farmers in South March.

1
St. Isidore Roman Catholic Church (South Marchl, Ontario), Register of Baptisms and Marriages, 1861-1968, James Lewis B2 [1883], database, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca/: accessed 8 October 2010), Ontario, Canada, Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1747-1967.