M.C. Moran

Upper Canada Militia Rolls, 1828-1829

Nowadays, people tend to think of militiamen and citizen’s militias and the like as a peculiarly American phenomenon, but that’s not really historically accurate. The whole apparatus of the citizen’s muster rolls was imported from England, actually, and can be found in Upper Canada from a relatively early phase.

Did your Ontario ancestor enroll as a militiaman? Well, some of my ancestors did. If you know or suspect that a (male) ancestor was in the province by 1828, it’s worth checking the militia rolls to find out.

Last Will and Testament of Francis Moran

Francis Moranwas born about 1812 in Co. Leitrim, Ireland, the son of Ambrose Moran and Margaret [maiden name unknown]. He emigrated to Canada about 1833, where he settled at Fitzroy township, Carleton Co. He married 1.) Margaret Behan; and 2.) Anne Galligan.

With his first wife, Margaret Behan (born Ireland about 1818; died Canada between 1846 and 1852) he had seven known children: Ambrose; Mary; Jeremiah; Catherine; Ellen; Catherine; and Francis.
On 4 January 1853 (Fitzroy Harbour Mission) he married Ann Galligan, born about 1827 in Co. Cavan, daughter of Denis Galligan and Ann Kelly.

Interestingly enough, there is no mention of his first family in his will, which is transcribed as follows:

Conditional Baptism

While going through RC parish registers in search of your Catholic ancestors, you may come across the phrase “baptized conditionally” or “baptized sub conditione,” or, in French, “baptisé(e) sous condition.” What did the padre mean, you may wonder, by this seemingly cryptic communication?

What the priest meant, basically, was that he had performed the baptism with words to the effect of, “If you are not already baptized, I baptize you.”

Hannie McCarthy (1924-2010)

Hannie McCarthy died in hospital last weekend, after a decline in health of several months’ duration.
I took this photograph of Hannie in June 2008, in her cottage at Farramanagh, Kilcrohane, on the Sheep’s Head peninsula in southwest Cork.
hannie_insidecottage.jpg

Safe home, Hannie. You will be remembered by everyone who knew you.

Certificate of/for Genealogical Tourism

Or “certificate of Irish heritage,” I guess it’s to be called. 

This article in the Irish Times includes some amusingly snarky comments about shamrocks and leprechauns and shillelaghs and the like:

‘If it’s not handled correctly, it could end up looking tacky,’ warns Smyrl. ‘Heritage and business aren’t incompatible, but too often we end up with leprechauns and shamrocks. This will end up as a gimmick if the only intention is to get people to visit Ireland.’

Tacky and gimmicky? Well, of course. Warning duly noted.

But faith and begorrah and etc., if it meant a 25 to 30 percent discount on transportation and lodging whilst visiting the auld sod, sure, I’d be more than willing to land at Shannon decked out in a day-glo green tracksuit with a large “Kiss Me I’m Irish” button fastened to my lapel. Oh wait. If I’m wearing a tracksuit, I guess I don’t really have a lapel. So, okay, maybe I wouldn’t go quite that far.

But I would totally fill out the necessary paperwork in order to obtain a significant travel discount. And I’m guessing that Ireland (land of the “ghost estate” following upon the burst of the real estate bubble) could use the tourism dollars these days.

(Via Deborah Large Fox’s Irish Family History blog, amongst other recent notices).