Ireland-to-Canada emigration: from which port?

According to historian Timothy J. Meagher (The Columbia Guide to Irish American History), Liverpool was the point of departure for the vast majority of Irish emigrants to both Canada and the United States, at least during the Famine period: Even most of the Irish bound for North America, however, first went through Britain, more specifically Liverpool. By the mid-1840s, over 90 percent of the Irish going to Canada or the United States went through Liverpool and over one million Irish passed through the city between 1847 and 1853.1 And how did these Irish emigrants get from Ireland to Liverpool, before embarking on their journey to the New World? By steam…

Go west (and then north), young man

(Click on the above image to see a larger version of the .jpeg file). My dad, John Alexander Moran (right) at Frobisher Bay, late 1950s. He said that he just went out west, presented himself to the office of the geological survey, and they hired him — by telling him to buy several items, including…

Best blog pseudonym ever

P.-F-X., for Pierre François-Xavier de Charlevoix (1682-1761), blogs at Charlevoix: Blogue de la Nouvelle-France – A Blog About New France. Pierre François-Xavier de Charlevoix was an eighteenth-century Jesuit priest, voyageur, teacher, and historian who is best remembered for his Histoire et description générale de la Nouvelle France (1744). He is considered one of the first historians of…

Link

Canadian historical newspapers online: a great collection of links at Kenneth R. Marks’ The Ancestor Hunt.

French Canadian “dit” names

Here is ancestry.ca’s record listing for the baptism of Marie Cleophie [Cléophée] Cheval, daughter of Joseph Cheval and Marie Louise Goneau: And here is ancestry.ca’s record listing for the marriage of Cleophes [Marie Cléophée] Cheval to Pierre Dubeau, son of Pierre Dubeau and Louise Poirier dit Desloges: Note that an ancestry.ca user has supplied a…