Category: Miscellaneous

Certificate of Irish Heritage

Long awaited, much derided, … and finally here. The site has gone live, and you can get your “plastic Paddy cert” through the newly launched Certificate of Irish Heritage website. “Plastic Paddy cert” (so apt, just great) is not my phrase, by the way, but that of Chris Paton at Scottish GENES. But see, I’m…

Summer Blogging Break

It’s time for my annual visit to Shaw’s of Perth: Advertisement for Shaw’s, Perth Courier, 10 August 1928. I’m sorry to have missed “the biggest, broadest, and most commanding sale ever held in Perth;” and I doubt they’re still offering Duchess silk for 98 cents per yard. But the current Shaw’s of Perth (no longer…

Mocavo (New Genealogy Search Engine)

Via Deborah Large Fox, a new genealogy search engine called Mocavo. As Deborah Large Fox points out, since Mocavo scours only genealogy-related sites, and therefore filters out genealogically irrelevant results, it has the potential to be quite useful to family history researchers, though the usual cautions apply (in general, the genealogical information that you find…

Spelling Doesn’t Count! (in Genealogy)

Most of the complaints that I hear from others involve relatives that dispute dates and spellings of names–the latter being a BIGGIE. I still have difficultly convincing new family researchers themselves to accept the fact that their ancestors’ names were spelled many ways. It can be impossible to convince relatives, especially those who have never gone…

Certificate of/for Genealogical Tourism

Or “certificate of Irish heritage,” I guess it’s to be called.  This article in the Irish Times includes some amusingly snarky comments about shamrocks and leprechauns and shillelaghs and the like: ‘If it’s not handled correctly, it could end up looking tacky,’ warns Smyrl. ‘Heritage and business aren’t incompatible, but too often we end up…

Family History and Family Mythology: Irish Version

No doubt this is an issue that crops up for family historians researching ancestors from any number of ethnic backgrounds and national origins. But I suspect the problem is especially prevalent in Irish genealogy, where the attempt to apply evidence-based methods typically involves cutting through vast areas long since overgrown by dense thickets of mythology. …