Tag Archive for Killeen

Irish (also English and Scottish) Origins, Canadian Sources: William Pigott’s enumeration of Fitzroy township (1851)

Here are my Moran ancestors in the 1851 census of Huntley township, Carleton County, Ontario (Canada West):

James Morin household, 1851 census of Canada West (Ontario), Carleton County, Huntley, p. 85, lines 44-50.

James Moran (here Morin), Farmer, born Ireland, religion R. [Roman] Catholic, age 54 at next birthday; with wife Margaret [Jamieson], also born Ireland; and children Thos [Thomas], James,1 Mary, Margaret and Alexander (my 2x great-grandfather, who married Mary Ann Leavy), all born Upper Canada.

Place of birth “Ireland” (no Irish county specified) for Irish emigrants to Canada is pretty much the standard for the 1851 (and 1861, 1871, and so on) Canadian census enumeration.

  1. James Moran, son of James and Margaret Jamieson, had recently died, at the age of 27. His death is listed under column 30 (Deaths during year 1851), with cause of death recorded as “collara” (cholera).

Bishop Guigues on John Lahey’s Donation

As a followup to my post on John Lahey the Elder, here is Bishop Guigue’s account of John Lahey’s donation of two acres to the mission of March (later the parish of St. Isidore, Kanata). The following (which I discovered through google books) is taken from Alexis de Barbezieux, Histoire de la province ecclésiastique d’Ottawa et de la colonisation de la vallée de l’Ottawa (Ottawa, 1897), which cites Guigue’s notes on his visit to March township in September 1848:

The Queen vs Kelly: Part IV

Continued from The Queen vs. Kelly: Part III.

Hard Times, Hard Labour

As reported in Part III, John Kelly entered the Dominion Penitentiary at Kingston on 15 May 1841, to serve a one-year sentence for the manslaughter of his brother-in-law Michael Hourigan.

Dickens described the penitentiary as ‘well and wisely governed’…

While we don’t have any details specific to Kelly’s one-year confinement in the penitentiary, we can assume it was a harsh, if not hellish experience. Though touted as a model of the new, and more humane approach to punishment and rehabilitation — when Charles Dickens visited the Dominion Penitentiary in the 1840s, he described it as “an admirable jail,…well and wisely governed, and excellently regulated, in every respect” 1 — the new prison at Kingston was in fact “a place of violence and oppression.” From an online history at Correctional Service Canada:

At the root of its problems in the early years was its first warden, Henry Smith. Smith’s use of flogging, even in an age when it was an accepted form of discipline, was flagrant. In 1847, inmates were given 6,063 floggings, an average of 12 per inmate. Women, and children as young as eight were flogged. As well, Smith punished inmates with shackling, solitary confinement, bread-and-water diets, darkened cells, submersion in water, 35-pound yokes, and imprisonment in the “box,” an upright coffin. His son ran the kitchen, profiteering by diverting food and serving rotten meat. In his spare time, he tortured inmates, once putting out a prisoner’s eye at archery practice.

Even by the severe standards of the day, Smith’s treatment of the prisoners was considered outrageous, and he was removed from his post as warden after an investigation into his abuses in 1848.

  1. Charles Dickens, American Notes (London: Chapman and Hall: 1874), etext edition, University of Virginia Library Electronic Text Center 1996, pp. 240-241.

James Ingram: Home Child

Found in the household of John Killeen in the 1901 census of Torbolton township, Carleton County (Ontario, Carleton, Torbolton, pp. 12-13, family 98):

    James Ingram, male, white, Orphan, single, date of birth 15 Nov 1887, age 14, born England u [urban], racial or tribal origin Irish, nationality Canadian, religion R. Cath [Roman Catholic].

The information on James Ingram’s religion and racial/tribal origin may or may not be accurate: the head of this household, the widowed John Killeen (widower of Margaret Fahey, whose mother was  a Lahey), was accurately listed as a Roman Catholic of Irish origin; and the census enumerator then used ditto marks to indicate the origin and religion of all other members of the household (accurate for John Killeen’s children, daughter-in-law, and grandchild, certainly, but perhaps not for James Ingram).

In July 1900, a James Ingram, age 13, travelled from Liverpool to Québec with a party of children from the Barnardo Homes. Is this the same James Ingram as found above?

Catholic Marriage Dispensations

If you come across a marriage record which notes the granting of a dispensation of consanguinity, you should definitely sit up and take note: you are looking at evidence of a common ancestor (or a pair of common ancestors) shared by both bride and groom. However, as Dan MacDonald points out in his Marriage Dispensations in Roman Catholic Marriage Records, the presence of a dispensation does not necessarily imply that a couple were related. It depends on the type of dispensation.

In addition to dispensations of consanguinity and affinity (which indicate a blood or marital relation, respectively, and which are pretty much always of interest to the genealogical researcher), the Church also granted dispensations from certain established rules and procedures surrounding the marriage ceremony.

For example, when John Killeen married Margaret Fahey on 20 December 1852, the priest (Rev. M. Molloy) noted that he had obtained a dispensation from the Bishop of Bytown to perform the marriage ceremony at “a fordidden time.” The “forbidden time” in this case was that of Advent (from the start of Advent to the Feast of the Epiphany); another “forbidden time” would be that of Lent (from Ash Wednesday to Low Sunday, or the first Sunday after Easter).

In 19th-century Ottawa Valley area RC parish registers (and no doubt in the RC registers of many other places too), the most common dispensation was that of a dispensation of one or two (and sometimes, although less frequently, of all three) of the required banns.

Denis Killeen’s Will

Denis Killeen made a will on 24 May 1850, a memorial of which was registered on 9 February 1854 (about three or four years after his death).
The memorial was “signed” (that is, marked with an X) by his eldest son Patrick Killeen; and was also signed (I mean, with actual signatures) by John Armstrong, Thomas Morgan, and Albert Hopper, all of March township. None of these three subscribing witnesses — John Armstrong, Thomas Morgan, and Albert Hopper — were related by blood or marriage, so far as I can tell. They were all Irish emigrants to March township, of Protestant (Church of England) background, presumably chosen as trustworthy and literate neighbours of the Irish Catholic Killeens.
The following is my transcription of the memorial, with hyperlinks to my database listings of the persons named in the will. A few words (indicated by brackets [ ] ) are illegible, or at least, not legible to me.


Denis Killeen at Québec, 1819 (RG 8, C Series, LAC)

One of my favourite genealogy blogs is John Reid’s Anglo-Celtic Connections. I don’t know how he does it, but he always has the latest scoop on the LAC (everything from hirings and firings to new collections to updates of existing collections, and so on). Yesterday at Anglo-Celtic Connections, I read the following notice from the LAC:

Ottawa, July 14, 2011 – Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is pleased to announce the addition of 484 digitized microfilm reels representing 1,125,141 new images regarding British military and naval records (RG 8, “C” Series) to its website. These records include a wide range of documents related to the British army in Canada, Loyalist regiments, the War of 1812, the Canadian militia, and more. Both microfilm reels for the nominal card index and the archival documents have been digitized and are now accessible online. Through the research tool “microform digitization,” you can browse the microfilm reels page by page.

Since I’m currently looking for military records pertaining to my 3x great-grandfather Denis Killeen, this sounded promising. So I followed the hyperlink provided by John Reid.

Here’s how I found a record of Denis Killeen’s recent arrival at Québec:

Description of Denis Killeen (1786-1850)

Denis Killeen was born about 1786 in the parish of Meelick in East Galway. On 10 December 1804 (presumably at the age of eighteen), he enlisted in the 97th Regiment of Foot (at “Clonaney” [Clonony?], King’s County [County Offaly]).
From the record of his discharge (10 December 1818), a physical (and occupational) description:
To prevent any improper use being made of this Discharge, by its falling into other Hands, the following is a Description of the said Denis Killeen. He is about thirty two Years of Age, is five Feet ten Inches in height, fair Hair, Grey Eyes, Swarthy Complexion; and by Trade or Occupation a Carpenter.1
Note the imprecision of “about ____ Years of Age,” in an official service record for a private in His Majesty’s 97th Regt of Foot.
Nowadays, an official military record (or an official record of any sort) will give a precise age, with an exact date of birth. For that matter, nowadays even most unofficial records will supply exact birth dates, based on the stringent demands for accuracy that define contemporary record-keeping: try sending your kid to sleepaway camp without providing the exact day/month/year of the child’s birth on the registration form! But two hundred years ago, people (the common folk, that is, but that was most people…) were a quite a bit looser about birth dates (which is one reason why, when searching 19th-century census returns, you should generally treat recorded birth years as rough estimates, perhaps accurate to within plus or minus five years or so of the given date).
Denis Killeen was discharged due to the disbandment of his regiment, after having served 14 years and 1 day. He received a pension from the Crown on 26 August 1819 (at which point he was in Upper Canada). On 26 May 1828 he received a patent from the Crown for one hundred acres, at the south half of Lot 11, Third Concession, in the township of March (Carleton Co., Ontario).

1 The National Archives of the UK (TNA), WO 119/70, Kilmainham Ref: [None] (Index No = 16), folio 43.

John Lahey the Elder

My 4x great uncle John Lahey the Elder bequeathed the bulk of his property (“one hundred acres of land more or less”) to his younger brother James, my 3x great-grandfather, but set aside two acres of land for the use of the RC Church. From a History of St. Isidore Church, March township, Kanata:
In 1848 the parish of March had another episcopal visit, this time from Bishop Joseph Eugene Guiges, who received an undertaking from John Lahey, donating ‘two acres of land for the upkeep of the church and of the Catholic priest who will be named by his excellency and his successors to serve this mission or parish of March. These two acres are situated on lot 14 and touch on one side the main road to Bytown and on the three others the property of the donor.’
In his last will and testament, dated 21 December 1853, John Lahey the Elder made good on his undertaking, “reserving to the Roman Catholic Church the two acres of land of said lot upon which the the chapel now stands.”
It was on this two acres of land that stood, until very recently, the Church of St. Isidore, which was built in the mid-1880s (and built in part by John Lahey the Elder’s nephew John, husband of Margaret Jane Killeen, and my 2x great-grandfather), with the cornerstone laid in 1887.
The stone church was demolished last August, to make way for something bigger and better and brighter, with a state-of-the-art media system, and with all mod cons. And who am I to question the inexorable march of progress?
Doesn’t quite sit well with me, though, and I predict that the new building will look less like a house of worship than like a Holiday Inn Convention Centre (I’m no conservative: I’m not asking for a Latin Mass; but dear God, please deliver us from that post-Vatican II architectural abomination known as “the Church in the Round”!). I also predict that the costs of the new building will vastly exceed even the most inflated estimates of restoring the old church, which figures were presented to parishioners as proof that historic preservation was crazy expensive and clearly unaffordable.
Anyway.
Click thumnail preview to see larger image:

johnlaheytheelder_1200px.jpg

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