Translating French Records: Catholic Marriage Records

Of the three types of Roman Catholic records most commonly used for genealogical purposes (baptismal, marriage, and burial), marriage records are often the most useful, and potentially the most complex. Most useful because of the sheer amount of genealogical information that can often be gleaned from a Catholic marriage record. While a baptismal record will … Continue reading Translating French Records: Catholic Marriage Records

From Ballymacegan, Lorrha, Tipperary to March Township, Carleton, Ontario

My Lahey ancestors came from Killycross Upper, Ballymacegan, Lorrha, Co. Tipperary, Ireland;[1. Killycross Upper and Killycross Lower were sub-townland denominations within the townland of Ballymacegan.] and emigrated to March Township, Carleton Co., Ontario, Canada from the mid-1820s to the early 1830s. And the reason why we have their townland of origin is that John Lahey, … Continue reading From Ballymacegan, Lorrha, Tipperary to March Township, Carleton, Ontario

“Of the Rail Road in this mission”

Thomas Benton (1826-1890) was born in Cappawhite, Co. Tipperary, Ireland, the son of Thomas Benton and Catherine ("Kitty") Dwyer. Of these facts I am now reasonably certain (which is to say, as certain as one can ever be when it comes to 19th-century Irish genealogy). But for the longest time, I had only "Thomas Benton, … Continue reading “Of the Rail Road in this mission”

SMASH! (that sound you just heard …

... was me smashing through a brick wall). Last May, I asked whether my brick-wall ancestor Thomas Benton might have been the son of Thomas Benton and Catherine Dwyer of Cappawhite, Tipperary. And the answer is Yes. If you have Irish Catholic ancestors, I cannot overemphasize the tremendous importance of the Catholic parish registers. In … Continue reading SMASH! (that sound you just heard …