M.C. Moran

Last Will and Testament of Denis Galligan

Denis Galligan (sometimes spelled Gallaghan) was born about 1815 in Co. Cavan, Ireland, probably (but this is not yet documented) the son of Denis Galligan and Anne Kelly. He emigrated to Canada in the early 1840s (as did his suspected parents Denis Galligan and Anne Kelly), where he settled at Fitzroy township (Carleton Co., Ontario). He married (presumably in Canada, about 1855) another Cavan native, Margaret (“Peggy”) Cahill (1820-1893), with whom he had seven known children: Anne, Mary, Bridget, Elizabeth, Margaret, Denis, and Michael. Denis Galligan died 3 December 1888, and is buried at St. Michael’s RC Cemetery, Corkery.

Daniel Driscoll: Home Child

Found in the household of James Moran and Sarah Jane Dooley in the 1891 census (Ontario, Carleton, Nepean, p. 5, family no. 23), a domestic servant named Daniel Driscoll, born in England about 1878:

  • Name: Driscoll, Danl
  • Sex: M
  • Age: 13
  • Relation to Head of House: Dom [Domestic]
  • Country or Province of Birth: Eng [England]
  • Place of Birth of Father: Eng
  • Place of Birth of Mother: Eng
  • Religion: R.C. [Roman Catholic]
He is not found in this household (now headed by a widowed Sarah Jane [Dooley] Moran) in the 1901 census.

“To Hear the Wolves Howl”

From some reminiscences written by Thomas Edwin Moran (1860-1942), son of Alexander Michael Moran and Mary Leavy:

My father known as Alexander Morin known as ‘Sandy’ married Mary Levi of Pakenham. They lived on a farm in the White Lake district, a virgin forest well populated with wolves, bear, and deer. If they wished to hear the wolves howl, they’d blow the dinner horn which was made of the bow of an ox and the wolves would answer. 
They lived a short time in Pakenham & returned to the homestead in Huntley & raised a family of 4 boys and 8 girls. He collected taxes for Huntley township from about 1869 until 1891…
…When Mrs Morin’s [i.e, Mary Leavy's] brother and sister came to visit, the brother asked, ‘Mary, would you like to have some deer meat?’ And she said ‘Yes.’ He wasn’t long gone when he returned and asked them to go with him to bring the deer in. He was not long fixing up the deer he had shot, and when they got back home he asked them if they took notice of him looking up on the rock which was nearby. They had not noticed. He said there was a wolf on the rock watching them while he was quartering the deer.  He said, ‘If that fellow had howled for his companions, we wouldn’t have got much deer.’*
*Emmett Patrick Sloan, Moran family history notes.

Arthur Joseph McGlade and Catherine Honora McCarthy

Arthur Joseph McGlade was born 3 April 1861, at Perth, Lanark Co., Ontario, the son of John McGlade and Bridget Dunne. Both his parents came from Co. Armagh, but met and married in Canada. Catherine (“Kate”) Honora McCarthy was born 7 June 1876, at Kitley township, Leeds Co., Ontario, the daughter of Eugene McCarthy and Honora/Ann McDonald [or possibly McDonnell]. Her father came from Farranamanagh, Kilcrohane, Co. Cork; her mother came from Co. Clare.

This photograph was apparently taken on or about their wedding date (18 October 1899).



Arthur Joseph McGlade and Catherine Honora McCarthy. Presumably taken October 1899.

Marriage of Michael Galligan and Elizabeth Jordan

I came across the marriage record for Michael Galligan and Elizabeth Jordan almost by accident. Not quite by accident, because I waslooking for Galligans in the Québec RC registers. But I was thinking of Ottawa Valley area parishes and missions, of places just across the Ottawa River from Carleton and Renfrew counties. It certainly hadn’t occurred to me that Michael Galligan might have been married in Montreal.

As far as I knew, Michael Galligan had been born in Co. Cavan, Ireland about 1812, had emigrated to Canada in the early 1840s, and had settled in Fitzroy township (Carleton Co., Ontario), where he had married an Elizabeth (maiden name unknown) from Co. Longford, Ireland. I also suspected that Michael was the son of Denis Galligan and Anne Kelly, who emigrated from Co. Cavan to Fitzroy township in the early 1840s.

Memories of the Morans

Emmett Patrick Sloan (1920-2007) was the son of John Percival Sloan and Mary Lillian Fagan, and a descendant, through his mother’s side, of James Moran and Margaret Jamieson. He was also a family historian who spent years constructing a very detailed family tree, which involved tracing any number of Morans and Leavys across North America. A few months before he died, he sent me his memories of my great-grandparents Alexander (‘Alec,’ ‘Alex’) Michael Moran (1872-1939) and Anna Maria (‘Annie’) Benton (1871-1947). He also gave me a big, thick binder of his Moran family history research notes, for which I am extremely grateful.

Last Will and Testament of Angelina McGlade (Angélique Ménard)

Angelina McGlade was the second wife of my great-great-grandfather John McGlade (1829-1891), and the stepmother of my great-grandfather Arthur Joseph McGlade (1861-1925, son of John McGlade and Bridget Dunne).

She was born Angélique Ménard, daughter of François Xavier Ménard and Angélique St. Ongé. I have not yet found her baptismal record, but I believe she was born about 1833, in the province of Québec, perhaps at or near Montreal; her Ontario civil death record (24 June 1894) lists her place of birth as “St. Marks. Que”.

Re: “Register for a User Account”

I currently have a password-protect on the family tree/genealogical database section of this site. This user/password thing is temporary. Basically, I’ve recently transferred my family tree database from a private, password-protected site (where I didn’t worry too much about displaying information about living persons) to this new and soon-to-be publicly accessible site which will not have a password. Except that I want to make sure I’ve removed/hidden all information about living persons before removing the password. I hope to finish this by the end of the week, at which point I will remove all user/password stuff.

Also: a couple of people have tried to Register for a User Account, as per the suggestion at the bottom of the page at the database section. I’m also going to remove this misleading suggestion, because I don’t plan to have user accounts. Sorry for the confusion! and again, I hope to have this sorted out by the end of the week.

Online Parish Histories: A Few (mostly RC) Examples

Local parish histories can be a great source of genealogical information. They are often produced to commemorate a landmark year (the 100th anniversary, or the 125th, or what have you, of the parish), and they typically contain an impressive (if typically un-indexed) list of names. Might your ancestor be among such a list? Well, it never hurts to look, as you never know what you might find.