Photographs

Johnny Moran sings ‘The Jolly Tinker’

John Alexander Moran, Ottawa, early 1960s

John Alexander Moran, Ottawa, early 1960s

My dad loved life; and family; and food; and drink; and song: he loved life, he loved it all.

He had a big heart. And he loved life: he loved it all.

As a younger man, when he was hale and hearty, he had a beautiful singing voice too. And he knew so many songs!

He taught us some of the old Irish ballads, and some of the newer Irish tunes too (yes, I can sing ‘The Dutchman’ from start to finish, without a cheat sheet: thanks, Dad!), and some Canadian folk songs, and a couple of dear old French Canadian numbers, as well. He taught us to always have a ‘party piece’ or two with which to entertain the company.

Here his voice had weakened, and he couldn’t remember all the lyrics, so my sister got the lyrics up through google, but he had trouble reading them from the screen. But as sick as he was here, he was game, he was ready to sing, and still his voice  rings true.

So  here he is, loving life while dying of cancer, singing “The Jolly Tinker.”1. He loved life; and family; and song: he just loved it all.

 

  1. Canadian Thanksgiving, 2012 = October 2012

John Joseph McCarthy, James McCarthy, and two unidentified

Courtesy of Ryan McCarthy (a descendant of Eugene McCarthy and his first wife Catherine Traynor), here’s a really nice studio portrait from about 1915 (taken at Perth, Lanark Co., Ontario):

Left to right: Unidentified (John Joseph McCarthy Sen.?); James Francis McCarthy; John Joseph McCarthy Jun.; Unidentified.

Only two of the four subjects (the two in the middle) can be positively identified. The two people in the middle are half-brothers: the young child is James Francis McCarthy (born 1912), son of John Joseph McCarthy (1869-1923) and his second wife Annie Powell; and the young man who is holding the child is John Joseph McCarthy (born 1893), son of John Joseph McCarthy and his first wife Catherine O’Dea. The man on the far left is probably John Joseph McCarthy Senior. The man on the far right is unidentified, though a notation on the back of the photograph suggests he might be an O’Dea.

John and Rosemary, in old Ottawa

My dad with his sister Rosemary (right) and a Lahey cousin (left), in some part of old Ottawa (Sandy Hill? the Glebe? Ottawa South?).

Early-to-mid 1950s here, and my dad and his sister in their late teens to early twenties. The three people in this photo probably now look a bit older than they actually were, owing to the tailoring of their (not formal, not dress-up) clothing. No sweatsuits, no leisure suits, no blue jeans or dungarees here, but these folks weren’t on their way to the ballroom, either: I believe this is what was once meant by “sports clothes” (no, not yet polyester slacks for men who hit the golf courses in Tampa, Florida) or “sporty casual.” Great shoes, in any case.

University of Ottawa Hockey Team, 1915

My grandfather Allan Jerome Moran played forward on the University of Ottawa’s hockey team of 1915. Love the stripey uniforms; and I guess that they were garnet and grey (from hence, apparently, the Ottawa U Gee-Gees). Their coach, the Rev. W.J. Stanton, O.M.I., may have been found guilty, or at least may have been implicated and considered partly guilty, in a riot that broke out at Cleveland in 1915, which resulted in some pretty serious injuries: by day an Oblate priest; by night a Dominion of Canada hockey goon? Still researching….
I found this photograph hidden behind another photograph, in the back of a picture frame. It was my grandfather’s personal copy, which he gave to my father, who gave it to me, and the following is my own scan.
Click thumbnail preview to see larger image:

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Jack McGlade (1900-1964)

My maternal grandfather John Eugene McGlade, son of Arthur Joseph McGlade and Catherine Honora McCarthy. I wish I had known him, but he died before I was born. He has always been something of a presence in my life, however, because he has always been very fondly remembered by his children (my mother and her five siblings), who have passed down many stories.

He had a gas station (or service station, as it was then called) at the corner of Gore and Craig Streets (in Perth, Lanark Co., Ontario), where there is now a Tim Horton’s. According to several of my aunts, he was a better person than he was a businessman: if someone had fought in the war (World War II, that is), he could never bring himself to collect on the account (‘Ah, well, now, he’s a veteran…’), and he also had a soft spot for a widow with a family (‘Ah, God love her, and with so many mouths to feed…well, maybe next month…’). He used to refer to my grandmother, Nana Dee, whom I knew very well, as “the Queen Bee,” a nice tribute to her brisk maternal competence (she had six children in just under nine years; and she used to drive the nuns around town in her big boat of a car;  and she also belonged to a curling club; and was just a force of nature overall).

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Catherine McCarthy, with granddaughter and daughter

I really like the ornamental border on this photograph. The detail looks 1920s to me, but in fact, this picture was taken in 1933. Left to right: my great-grandmother Catherine McCarthy; my mother’s eldest sister (daughter of John Eugene McGlade and Delia Lucie Derouin); and my great-aunt Neen (Noreen McGlade, daughter of Catherine McCarthy and Arthur Joseph McGlade). Drummond Street, Perth (Lanark Co., Ontario).

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