Tag Archive for McCarthy

Honora (“Annie”) McDonald/McDonnell (1841-1914)

My great-great-grandmother Honora (“Ann,” “Annie”) McDonald (or possibly McDonnell?).
Born about 1841 (April 1841 according to the 1911 Canadian census) in Co. Clare, Ireland, the daughter of Patrick McDonald (or McDonnell?) and Catherine Dea. Apparently emigrated to Canada as a young girl (late 1840s to mid-1850s?). Her first husband was a David Mahoney (also born Co. Clare), who died about 1867 at Smiths Falls, Lanark Co., Ontario, leaving her a widow with three young daughters. She then married (21 March 1872) Eugene McCarthy (born about 1834 at Farranamanagh, Kilcrohane, Co. Cork, Ireland), whose first wife Catherine Traynor/Treanor had died in 1871, leaving him a widower with four young children.
Eugene McCarthy and Honora McDonald/McDonnell had two daughters: Ellen McCarthy (who married John Fowler) and Catherine Honora McCarthy (my great-grandmother, who married Arthur Joseph McGlade).
Honora (McDonald/McDonnell) McCarthy died at Toledo, Leeds Co., Ontario on 19 April 1914. She is buried at St. Frances de Sales Cemetery in Smiths Falls, Lanark Co., Ontario, with her first husband David Mahoney.

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Blended Families

When I first read the Perth Courier’s obituary (January 1941) for my great-grandmother Catherine McCarthy (Mrs. Arthur McGlade), I was puzzled to read that she was survived by, amongst other people, a sister named Miss Mary Mahoney. Miss (as in, never married) Mahoney? But shouldn’t that be Miss Mary McCarthy?

Well, no, not necessarily. Not if Miss Mary Mahoney was a half-sister of Catherine McCarthy, with a father named Mahoney who had previously been married to Catherine McCarthy’s mother Anne McDonald (or possibly McDonnell). Simplest explanation in the world, and of course it should have immediately occurred to me. But I was so focused on the surnames McCarthy and McGlade, that it actually took a bit of digging to make sense of it all.
The “blended family” is nothing new, of course. Back in the day when a woman dying in childbirth was no rare or unusual occurrence, and when a man in the prime of life, and seemingly hale and hearty the last time his neighbours ever saw him alive, might be carried off by influenza within the course of week, remarriage was quite common, and households containing children from a previous marriage were therefore quite commonplace. If you were a widow or a widower with a parcel of young children to be fed and watered, your best bet was probably to find yourself a new spouse: a new husband to bring home the bread, or a new wife to bake it. And the possibility of a remarriage is something to keep in mind when you’re looking through the 19th-century census returns: don’t assume that all of the children in a household are the children of the enumerated married couple of that household.
When Eugene McCarthy married Ann McDonald (21 March 1872), he was the widower of Catherine Trainor, with whom he had five known children (with one of them, Charles, presumably dying in infancy). And when Ann McDonald married Eugene McCarthy (21 March 1872), she was the widow of David Mahoney, with whom she had three known children, all of them daughters. Here is their blended family household from the 1881 Canadian census (transcription by ancestry.ca, with original image [LAC] here):
mccarthy_eugene_household_1881census.jpg
The above household contained children from three separate marriages:
1. Eugene McCarthy and Catherine Trainor (Jeremiah, James, Mary, and John McCarthy);
2. David Mahoney and Ann McDonald (Mary J., Abigail, and Annie Mahoney);
3. Eugene MCarthy and Ann McDonald (Ellen and Catherine McCarthy)
Abigail (Catherine Abigail, nickname “Abby”) Mahoney is mentioned in Catherine McCarthy’s (Mrs. Arthur McGlade’s) obituary as “Mrs B. Dignan,”  which again, was initially a bit mystifying to me. She married Bartholomew, son of James Dignan and Catherine Cahill, whose nickname in combination with his surname (“Bartley Dignan”) is perhaps my favourite name ever to be found in my family tree, though with the duo of Mickey and Maisie Moran running a close second (when John Levi [Leavy] “Mickey” Moran married Mary Katherine “Maisie” Dunn, to become Mickey and Maisie Moran, that couple should have put on a Broadway show or something, their paired names had such a lovely alliteration).

Catherine Honora McCarthy: Confirmation Photo

My great-grandmother Catherine Honora McCarthy, daughter of Eugene McCarthy (originally of Co. Cork) and Ann/Honora McDonald (or possibly McDonnell, originally of Co. Clare), at age 13, on the occasion of her Confirmation (at St. Philip Neri, in Toledo, Kitley township, Leeds Co., Ontario) in 1889. With older sister Ellen, and note the age-related difference in the lengths of their skirts.

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She looks like my mother (or vice-versa, of course).

Hannie McCarthy (1924-2010)

Hannie McCarthy died in hospital last weekend, after a decline in health of several months’ duration.
I took this photograph of Hannie in June 2008, in her cottage at Farramanagh, Kilcrohane, on the Sheep’s Head peninsula in southwest Cork.
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Safe home, Hannie. You will be remembered by everyone who knew you.

Arthur Joseph McGlade and Catherine Honora McCarthy

Arthur Joseph McGlade was born 3 April 1861, at Perth, Lanark Co., Ontario, the son of John McGlade and Bridget Dunne. Both his parents came from Co. Armagh, but met and married in Canada. Catherine (“Kate”) Honora McCarthy was born 7 June 1876, at Kitley township, Leeds Co., Ontario, the daughter of Eugene McCarthy and Honora/Ann McDonald [or possibly McDonnell]. Her father came from Farranamanagh, Kilcrohane, Co. Cork; her mother came from Co. Clare.

This photograph was apparently taken on or about their wedding date (18 October 1899).



Arthur Joseph McGlade and Catherine Honora McCarthy. Presumably taken October 1899.