Queries

John McGlade and Bridget Dunne: same parish of origin?

I’ve long since known that my 2x-great-grandparents John McGlade and Bridget Dunn/Dunne came from the same Irish county (Armagh). I’ve sometimes wondered whether they also came from the same parish too?

Marriage of John McGlade and Bridget Dunn, St. Edward's, Westport, Leeds Co., Ontario.

According to their marriage record (now available online and free of charge through FamilySearch), they did. From the register of St. Edward’s, Westport (Leeds Co., Ontario), here is the marriage record for “John McGleade [McGlade], son of Michael McGleade and Elizabeth Kennelly of the the Parish of Parish [sic] of lower Killevy Co Armagh on the [one] Part, to Bridget Dunn, daughter of Owen Dunn and Anne Rock of the Parish of lower Killevy Co Armagh on the other part.” I currently have John McGlade as a native of the neighbouring parish of Forkhill, but this document suggests I need to dig deeper into the available records for my McGlade ancestors.

The above from a new online database at FamilySearch: Ontario, Roman Catholic Church Records, 1760-1923. For those researching Catholic ancestors in Ontario, this is a pretty huge development. While these records have long been available on microfilm through LDS Family History Centers, it’s pretty amazing to now have online access (and that online access free of charge). Some of the parishes are already available online through ancestry.ca’s Ontario, Canada, Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1747-1967 dababase (which requires a subscription). But many of the parishes in the new FamilySearch database (from the Ontario counties of Leeds, Lanark, and York, to name just a few examples) are not, because they’re not part of the Drouin collection.1

FamilySearch’s Ontario, Roman Catholic Church Records, 1760-1923 database is not indexed at all, which means you’ll have to search the records the “old-fashioned” way (page by page, I mean), though in a “new-fashioned” manner (at home, on your own computer screen, say).

  1. Ancestry.ca’s Ontario Drouin database represents a digitisation of the parish registers that were microfilmed by the Drouin Institute/Institut Généalogique Drouin in the 1940s, 50s, and 60s. Since the Drouin Institute’s purpose was to preserve records pertaining to French Canadians, their Ontario records represent areas with significant French-speaking populations. So: Ottawa area parishes, but not Toronto, for example.

Who was Daniel Galligan (1821-1889)?

(Or: who were the parents of John Galligan, husband of Ellen McGee?)

Daniel Galligan was born about 1821 in Co. Cavan, Ireland, the son of Daniel Galligan and Mary Walsh.1  I don’t know when he emigrated to Canada, but I haven’t found him in either the 1851 or the 1861 Canadian census returns. Presumably he arrived later than the Galligans of Fitzroy (some of whom later moved to Renfrew Co.), with whom he was obviously connected.

Once in Canada he worked as a tailor, and seems to have moved around a fair bit. Two records place him in Pontiac Co., Québec by 1871. In Lovell’s Province of Quebec Directory for 1871, there is a Galligan, Daniel, tailor listed in the village of Chapeau, Allumette Island. And in the 1871 census, Daniel Gallagan, Tailor (age 45, born Ireland) can be found in the household of a Matthew Kelly and his wife Roseann, at Allumette Island, Pontiac Co, Québec.  By the 1881 census enumeratrion, he was in Faraday, Hastings Co., Ontario, where he was again listed as a tailor (age 60, born Ireland), and now apparently living alone.

Daniel Galligan died at Kingston (Frontenac Co., Ontario) on 23 July 1889, and was buried at Arnprior (Renfrew Co., Ontario) on 25 July 1889.

Witnesses to the burial were Michael Galligan and Thomas Daniel Galligan. Michael Galligan was the son of Denis Galligan and Anne Kelly. Thomas Daniel Galligan was the son of John Galligan and Ellen McGee, and a suspected grandson of Denis Galligan and Ann Kelly (unless he was the grandson of Daniel’s parents Daniel Galligan and Mary Walsh?). Not only did these Fitzroy (or Fitzroy-Renfrew) Galligans attend his burial, they also erected a headstone, which reads “In Memory of Daniel Galligan Died July 23 1889 AE. 68 Yrs.”

I have John Galligan (1826-1906) in my database as a son of Denis Galligan and Anne Kelly. However, my evidence for this relationship is indirect and circumstantial, and I haven’t yet found the document (e.g., the record of his marriage to Ellen McGee) that would resolve the question of his parentage. It’s possible that John was a brother of Daniel, and therefore a son of Daniel Galligan and Mary Walsh.

  1. The names of his parents are given in his burial record: St (John) Chrysostom (Arnprior, Renfrew Co., Ontario), Register of Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1883-1893, p. 171, image 90 of 162, Daniel Galligan, S(épulture), database, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca/: accessed 5 October 2011), Ontario, Canada, Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1747-1967.

Two Derouin Brothers

Two Derouin brothers, sons of Joseph Derouin and Mathilde Dubeau, and siblings of my grandmother Delia Lucie (Derouin) McGlade:

  • Edgar Derouin, apparently born 26 February 1893 (but this birth date is from the census; I have not yet found a baptismal record). He was born at Otter Lake, Pontiac Co., Québec; and may have moved to Arnprior with his parents and other siblings in the early 1920s. In 1943, he was apparently living in Noranda (now Rouyn-Noranda) in northwestern Québec. There is some confusion as to his first name: in the 1901 census he is listed as Eddoré; in the 1911 census as Hector. An Ottawa Citizen newspaper item from 1943 identifies him as Edgar.
  • Pierre Albert Derouin, born at Otter Lake on 28 September 1897; baptized 18 October 1897 (Ste. Elisabeth, Vinton, Litchfield township, Pontiac Co.). Presumably moved to Arnprior with his family in the early 1920s. In 1943, as per the above-mentioned newspaper item, he was apparently living in Timmins, Ontario. Also known as Peter Derouin.
I’m looking for any information (marriage; family; death; burial; etc.) about the above two Derouin brothers.

Ann Lahy/Lahey, wife of William Coil/Coyle

On 29 September 1846, William Coil/Coyle, son of Thomas Coil and Ann Wellworth “du comte de Tipperary” (of the county of Tipperary), married Ann Lahy, daughter of John Lahy and Ann Fitzpatrick, also of Tipperary (“du même comte”/of the same county). Witnesses to the marriage were John Doherty (Dogherty/O’Dogherty) and James [Brogan? Bingham?]. Marriage record found in the parish register for Notre Dame Basilica, Ottawa:

annlahey_wmcoyle_1846marriage_notredame.jpg

Ottawa; Ottawa (basilique Notre Dame), Register of Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1845-1847, M. 81 (1846), Wm Coil and Ann Lahy, image 98 of 181, Ancestry.ca (http://ancestry.ca/: accessed 3 April 2011), Ontario, Canada, Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1747-1967.

Given the common surname and the common county of origin, along with their shared settlement in the Bytown area, I wonder if this Ann Lahy was related to my Lahy/Lahey ancestors who emigrated to March township (Carleton Co., Ontario) from Ballymacegan, Lorrha, Co. Tipperary?

Michael Donahue and Hanora Killeen: 12 Children, 1 Marriage?

Hanora (sometimes Anna or Hanna/Hannah) Killeen was one of the eldest (perhaps the second eldest) daughters of Denis Killeen and Mary Ahearn. She was born in March township in the early 1820s, possibly (as per the 1901 Canadian census return) on 10 May 1821.

Hanora’s older sister Ellen Killeen (born Ireland about 1818) married a “Matthew Daly of Huntley” (born Ireland about 1807) in 1836 (Notre Dame, Bytown/Ottawa). Matthew Daley and Ellen Killeen had a very large family, with their first four children (Peter, Mary, Denis, and John) born in Huntley township (Carleton Co., Ontario/Upper Canada), and their sixth and later children born at Clarendon, Pontiac Co., Québec/Lower Canada. It’s not clear where their fifth child, Bridget, was born (whether at Huntley or at Clarendon), but certainly they were living in Clarendon by 1847. (Some of their sons, including Anthony Daley, later emigrated to the States.)
Hanora Killeen had presumably moved from March township to Clarendon to be with her older sister, for by 1850 she was described as being “domiciled at Clarendon.”

Bridget O’Hanlon = Sister of Ann O’Hanlon Vallely?

On 15 November 1841, in the parish of Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours at Montebello, Papineau Co., Québec, Thomas McTeague married Bridget O’Hanlon. The names of the couple and of their parents were written as follows (with my translation/interpretation in italics):


Thomas McTeague, fils majeur de Joseph McTeague et de Brigitte Scerloc, du Township de Grenville, d’une part; et Brigitte O’honlon domiciliée en Grenville, fille majeure de Pierre O’honlon et de Marie Thooner, domiciliés en Irlande, d’autre part…[Thomas McTeague, son of age of Joseph McTeague and of Bridget Sherlock, of the Township of Grenville, on the one part; and Bridget O'Hanlon, residing at Grenville, daughter of age of Peter O'Hanlon and of Mary (Toner?) who reside in Ireland, on the other part]*

The witnesses to this marriage were Charles Major (who signed the register), George Vallillee (who did not sign), and Owen McTeague (who signed).

The reason why the above-cited record interests me is that George Vallillee/Vallely is my 3x great-grandfather, and his first wife Anne O’Hanlon my 3x great-grandmother. Did he witness this marriage as a brother-in-law of Bridget O’Hanlon?

And where did Thomas McTeague and Bridget O’Hanlon eventually settle? A quick search of the 1851 Canadian census turns up a number of McTeagues in Grenville (Deux Montagnes County, Canada East), but no sign of Thomas and wife Bridget O’Hanlon.

*Montebello (Co. Papineau, Québec), Register of Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1840-1851, M. 5 (1841), McTeague et O’honlon, p. 23, Ancestry.ca (http://ancestry.ca/: accessed 12 Dec 2010), Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967.


Who was Jennie Stafford?

Found in the household of John Sullivan and Mary Ann Galligan in the 1901 census for Arnprior, Renfrew Co., Ontario:

Stafford, Jennie, Adopted, born 1891 (no day or month given), age 9, place of birth Ontario, racial or tribal origin Irish, nationality Canadian, religion Roman Catholic, attending school 10 months in the year.*
This family had a daughter Mary Catharine Sullivan, born 1891 (so: roughly the same age as Jennie Stafford), who died of nephritis at age 9, in December 1899. Did they adopt (which is to say, informally adopt) Jennie Stafford after the death of their daughter of the same age? Certainly, this family had no shortage of children, with five known sons, four of them still living in 1901, but with only one other daughter, Ellen, born 1880, and listed as age 19 in the 1901 enumeration.
Jennie Stafford is not found in the Sullivan-Galligan household in the 1911 census.
Was she indeed born in Ontario, as listed in the 1901 census, or was she born in England and “adopted” by this family as a Home Child?
*1901 Census of Canada, Ontario, Renfrew (South/Sud), District Number 111, Arnprior (Town/Ville), Subdistrict B-1, p. 9.

Brennan-Connelly Query

On 12 February 1870 (Ste. Anne, Calumet Island/l’Île du Grand Calumet, Pontiac Co., Québec) Thomas Brennan, son of Patrick Brennan and Matilda Shirley, married Susanna Connelly, daughter of John Connelly and Ellen Cahill. This couple then seems to disappear from the Canadian records. Did they emigrate to Leadville, Colorado?

The 1880 US federal census for Leadville, Lake, Colorado has a T.W. Brennan (age 37, born Canada), with wife Susan (age 33, born Canada), and children Shirley [male], Delacey, Mary, D. [?] and Margaret. The names Shirley and Delacey (here given as first names) are surnames found in the family trees of Thomas Brennan and Susanna Connelly, respectively.

Where was Patrick Killeen born?

Different Sources, Different Birthplaces

In a history of Ottawa published in 1927, A.H.D. Ross wrote that “the first white child born in the Township of March was Patrick Killean, whose father, Denis Killean, was in Captain Monk’s employ, and the second was Benning Monk.”1 Perhaps Ross was relying on Mrs. M.H. Ahearn’s earlier “The Settlers of March Township,” which was first read before the Women’s Canadian Historical Society of Ottawa on 10 March 1899, and later published by the Ontario Historical Society. According to Mrs. Ahearn:
The first settler to locate [in March township] was Captain John Benning Monk, of H.M. 97th Regiment, who arrived in June, 1819, having been paddled and portaged in boats from Montreal, where he had the misfortune to lose his baby daughter. Leaving his wife in Hull, Captain Monk proceeded by river to March, where, with his soldier servants, he constructed a rude shanty, to which he brought Mrs. Monk, and which was aptly named ‘Mosquito Cove’ by the much-tormented occupants…
…Captain Monk had ten children, and among his numerous descendants are several prominent citizens of Ottawa. One son is G.W. Monk, ex-M.P.P. for Carleton County, and Mrs. Chas. McNab, a well-known member of our society, to whom the writer is indebted for many details of this sketch, is a daughter. The eldest son, the late Benning Monk, was the second child born in March; Patrick Killean, whose parents were servants of Captain Monk, and who afterwards took up land in South March, being the first.2
It’s not clear where Mrs. Ahearn got her information about Patrick Killean/Killeen’s birth, although it may have been part of the detail supplied to her by Mrs. Chas. McNab (Frances Amelia Monk, daughter of Captain John Benning Monk and Elizabeth Fitzgerald).

Where did John Lahey Go?

Or; Margaret Jane Killeen, the Widow who Wasn’t

There are a couple of notable scandals to be found in the annals of my Lahey ancestors, but I think I’ll leave the manslaughter cases for a later entry. For now, just a little story of family desertion and family reunion.


John Lahey of March

John Lahey was born at March township (Carleton Co., Ontario, Canada) in March 1837, the first and only child of James Lahey, originally of Ballymacegan, Lorrha, Co. Tipperary, and Ann Armstrong, originally of Co. Cavan. He was baptized 2 April 1837 (Notre Dame, Ottawa), with James Armstrong (his mother’s brother) and Mary [Lahey] Hourigan (his father’s sister) serving as godparents. His mother died 17 Dec 1839, when he was not yet two years old, at which point his father was apparently in legal custody in connection with one of the above-mentioned scandals (of which more to follow in a later entry…). So it’s not exactly clear who raised him, but presumably his paternal aunt Mary Lahey, aka the Widow Hourigan, played a part, as did his paternal uncle John Lahey, a lifelong bachelor whose land (at Concession III, Lot 14, March township) he was to eventually inherit.